** WORK SESSIONS 2021 **

Conservation work on Brook Meadow
Management of Brook Meadow is essential to maintain an appropriate habitat for wildlife and to enhance the biodiversity of the site. To achieve this, the conservation group works in co-operation with the local Council and other agencies to keep the meadow in good order both for wildlife and for public use. It holds regular conservation work sessions to manage grassland, scrub and woodland and, generally, to keep the meadow clean and tidy. The rivers are primarily managed by the Environment Agency to maintain a good flow of water, avoid flooding, and to create a good habitat for fish, Water Voles and other riparian wildlife.


Volunteer work sessions
Regular conservation work sessions on Brook Meadow take place on the 1st Sunday and the 3rd Thursday of each month throughout the year.  Work sessions start at 10.00am with a guaranteed finish time of 12 noon. Everyone is welcome and tools are provided. We meet at the new tool store HQ at the end of Seagull Lane. Safety for all volunteers is a priority and risk assessments by trained members are given at each session. There is a break when refreshments are served.
The main tasks include cutting and clearing of the grassland and scrub, removing broken tree branches and keeping pedestrian paths open and clear of obstacles. Clearing litter is a priority. Children and students from local schools and colleges are welcome to join in for work experience.


Conservation Work session – Thursday 18th November 2021
Report by Reg Newnham. Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows
Twelve volunteers (including leader) turned out on a grey, but dry Autumn Day. The meadow temp. was 12 C. Reg Newnham was leading. All the volunteers arrived at the start time, apart from Dan & Terry who were at the Lumley Stream installing the raft. There were two new volunteers Sally and Ann.   After the usual brief welcome the tasks for the session were described and the group photo taken by Brian.
The tasks were:
1. To complete the removal of the meadow cuttings (arisings) from the main orchid area on the North Meadow where wildflowers grow in abundance. This area had been cut last  month and the seed heads had now fallen. Kathy Edwards led this large work party including Pam, David, Patsy, Sally, Suzanne and Patsy. It is planned to mark this area with stakes so that management will be easier next year and to protect the plants from undue trampling by members of the public in the growing season.  This should be the last need for raking any part of Brook Meadow this year. So both wildflower areas have been cut and cleared all ready for the new season.

Raking the main orchid area

Hauling and dumping

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work complete

2. Launch a feeding raft on Lumley Stream. (Dan & Terry)

3. Trim the hedgerow on the western boundary of the Seagull Lane Patch which has become overgrown. Colin Brotherston led this small work party helped by Maurice Lillie.

4. Power scythe for a second time the area around the Rowan trees. The arisings will be left on site till next year. Tony and Gordon.

Rowan area cutting complete

5. Litter picking and cleaning signcases. Thanks to Beryl Wright, Lesley Harris and newcomer Ann.   Keeping the meadow tidy discourages anti-social actions.

6. Move some branches and logs from the large Crack Willow tree on the north river that was felled by the Environment Agency.


There was a welcome stop for coffee at 11.00 with a good selection of biscuits. Thank you, Pam. The coffee Break was held by Frank’s bench .

All tasks were completed, apart from the western boundary hedge where 10 meters were cut back and another 40 meters still outstanding.
Another outstanding job is to repair the dog splash zone in the north-east corner.   On inspection the river has washed away the gravel so if we replaced the gravel the same would reoccur. Therefore, concrete blocks will be required. A requested went out to the volunteers and we will have now sourced this material. Thank you Patsy.
At 12.00 tools were returned to HQ as the session finished. HQ was finally secured at 12.10

Video clip. Raking arisings from orchid area – https://youtu.be/3jbP7MxLtx0
To open – right click the link and choose open in a new window.

Wildlife observations
Kathy discovered another Harvest Mouse nest while clearing the orchid area – the second one we have found this season.
A Red Admiral was resting on one of the reptile mats on the east side of the north meadow. Red Admirals have been very numerous this autumn. They could well go through the winter if it is reasonably mild.
Some of the Rowans have a covering of black lichen which I think is called Lecidella lichen.   I have previously noted this lichen on the smooth bark of the Ash trees near the main seat on the meadow.  It does not harm the trees.


Conservation Work session – Sunday 7th November 2021
Report by Kathy Edwards.  Photos & wildlife by Brian Fellows
Twelve volunteers (including leader) turned out on a lovely sunny autumnal day, with only a slight breeze. There had been little rain over the past week which meant that the grass was dry despite being a little soggy in places under foot. Kathy was leading and most of the volunteers arrived at the start time of 10.00. The usual welcome, briefing and safety reminders were soon concluded.
Thank you to Helena for taking the group photo, enabling Brian to take part!
There were only a limited number of tasks today, as most of the volunteers were assigned the job of  raking up the arisings from the flower rich areas in the central and north meadows.  These areas had been power scythed by Nigel since the last workday and the dry condition of the cut grass made it a sensible task on which to focus.  Jennifer, Debbie. Patsy, Pam, Reg, Terry and Nigel all worked hard clearing the Lumley wild flower area.  The height of the compost heaps at the end of the session was testament to the amount of arisings that were removed and Nigel’s strength with the dragging was particularly noteworthy.

Clearing the Lumley Area

Tony was tasked with using the power scythe today.  Together with Maurice he finished cutting the centre of the flower area in the North meadow. After this they went on to cut the tangle of vegetation around the Rowan trees.  This was not an easy job as the bindweed was prolific and often impeded a straightforward cut.  While Maurice was assisting Tony he also found time to extricate the white bag from one of the cherry trees using a useful piece of branch he had squirreled away.  This has been an annoying feature for some time, so well done Maurice.

Colin and Helena undertook the heavy task of transporting gravel to the main path in the South meadow. There were a couple of wet, muddy areas where someone had put down rather slippery boards.  These boards were removed and the areas filled in with the gravel. The whole path needs to be done but it was evident that the bags of gravel need to be closer in order to complete this.

A well-deserved coffee break was taken at 11am, ably provided by Pam as usual.
After the break most people returned to their former tasks, with Colin and Helena joining the rakers.  Raking of the Lumley area was soon completed so this group made a start on clearing the arisings from the north meadow flower area.
Jennifer and Debi volunteered to do the litter picking and sign cleaning after coffee, managing also to collect some of the rubbish out of the river.

This busy and successful session ended at 12.00 and the tools were packed away. There was some delay before the tool store was able to be locked owing to a missing rake. Just when we decided it would have to stay hidden Nigel discovered it in the long grass and the store was finally locked at 12.30.

Nice to see Debbie at the work session
Wildlife observations during work session
Kathy came across the nest of a Harvest Mouse while clearing the main orchid area. We do occasionally find these very distinctive round nests on the meadow during clearance work. We rarely see the animals, though in March this year Susan Kelly saw one scrambling on the shrubs near the Lumley gate and Pam Phillips saw what could have been the same animal on her back garden fence which is close to the Lumley entrance.
The lone Alder bush on the Lumley area whose leaves have been seriously nibbled has a good crop of cones and catkins for next year.
During today’s clearance of the main orchid area, I spotted a single stem of what I think is the seed head of a Common Spotted Orchid.
There are several good clusters of Common Fleabane seedheads on the centre meadow. Also showing well on the centre meadow are fresh stems of Hard Rush and a late showing of the grass Tall Fescue.

It was interesting to see Meadowsweet in flower on the west side of the centre meadow. It is not totally unusual to get a late flowering of this attractive aromatic plant well into November.
I found a tiny brown moth on a flowering head of Hogweed on the north path. Possible ID is Anthophila fabriciana or Common Nettle-tap. Small brownish mottled moth 10-15mm in length. Common. Flies April to November often over Common Nettle its main food plant. David Search can you confirm or deny from this photo?
The large Crack Willow that had fallen into the north river has been removed. The logs and cut branches have been neatly laid beside the path.   Maurice thinks it was the work of the Environment Agency.   Whoever, it was a good job well done.


SUNDAY OCTOBER 31 – 2021
Colin, Maurice and Nigel were on Brook Meadow this afternoon to start cutting the two main wild flower areas in preparation for raking and clearing the arisings on next Sunday’s work session. The vegetation was surprisingly dry despite the heavy rain overnight and this morning. Here are photos of Nigel operating the power scythe on the Lumley area and on the orchid area on the north meadow.


Conservation Work session – Thursday 21st October 2021
Report by Reg Newnham. Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows
Thirteen volunteers (including leader) turned out on a wonderful Autumn day with sunshine all morning. The meadow temp. was 12 C and climbed all morning to 16C. Reg Newnham was leading. All the volunteers arrived at the start time. There was one new volunteer.

Reg signing in Beryl

After the usual brief welcome the tasks for the session were described.
The tasks were:
1. To remove the meadow cuttings (arisings) from the South Meadow. This area had been cut some time ago, as the seed heads had now fallen. Maurice Lillie led this work party.

2. A trunk of a Crack Willow had fallen over a year ago in the Central Meadow, but in the last week had moved further so that it now was blocking the main lower path. This large tree was made safe. The main trunk was moved off the path & the side branches removed. Thanks to Paul, Gordon and Tony.

3. The hedge on the western boundary of the Seagull Lane Patch, has become overgrown and needed clearing and tiding. Colin Brotherston led this work party. More work needed on this job.

4. Continue to audit the reptile mats and lay additional mats per the map plan. Dan Mortimer continued this important work.

5. Litter picking & cleaning sign cases. Thanks to Beryl Wright. By keeping the meadow tidy this discourages anti-social actions.
There was a welcome stop for coffee at 11.00 with a good selection of biscuits. Thank you, Pam. The coffee break was held at the main seat.
So that the clearing arisings task from the south meadow could be completed the hedge party moved to this area after coffee.
Maurice reported . . . “At the end of this morning’s session a substantial area had been cleared and dumped. The ground is very wet and much of the arisings from Nigel’s cutting was rotted and too hard to completely collect. It will be interesting to see what comes up next year”. Here is the completed work.

Strimming the river bank south of the north bridge had been done on a previous day by David Search and Dan.
At 12.00 tools were returned to HQ as the session finished. HQ was finally secured at 12.10
The next work session is scheduled for Sunday 7th November 2021.

Wildlife observations
from Brian
At the end of the work session I retired to my favourite log seat on the ‘play area’ for a rest – this is a lovely sun trap.
I was joined at different times by a Red Admiral and a male Common Darter. Just wait and wildlife comes to you!

The attractive yellow flowers of Bristly Ox-tongue have petals tinged with red on the undersides. Two late flowering grasses are currently prominent on the north meadow: False Oat-grass and Cocksfoot, the former of which has a particularly attractive loose panicle.

I spotted a brownish moth fluttering around the north meadow. From the metallic mark on the wing this could be a Silver Y Moth which is fairly common flying by day in late autumn.
Finally, I got a quick shot of a Hornet Mimic hoverfly before it flew off.

Dan reports that Sarah Hughes and Alison will be carrying out a Water Vole survey on Brook Meadow tomorrow (Friday 22nd) from 9am. They will be covering both the Lumley Stream and the River Ems. I gather he will be helping and getting in the water with them!   He will report back on their findings. Let’s hope they throw some light on why we have seen any Water Voles for the past 4 years.


Conservation Work session – Sunday 3rd October 2021
Report by Kathy Edwards. Photos & wildlife by Brian Fellows
Twelve volunteers (including leader, Kathy) turned out on a surprisingly warm and largely cloud free morning. Most of the volunteers arrived at the start time of 10.00. The usual welcome, briefing and safety reminders were soon concluded.
Today’s weather was in sharp contrast to yesterday when it rained almost continually and was accompanied at times by some strong winds. As a result of yesterday’s weather the meadow was understandably quite sodden in places and therefore some tasks, such as the very wet piles of arisings in the south meadow, were best left for another workday when they were drier and lighter to manage.

Here is Kathy allocating jobs
The tasks chosen for today were:
1   Trimming the overhanging vegetation on the raised paths undertaken by Debi and Patsy and others.

2.  Power scything the east side of the Seagull Lane patch.  This was a job for Nigel our power scythe man.

3.  Clearing arisings from previous cuttings on the Seagull Lane patch.   Pam set to work on this job.  Here is Pam stacking the cuttings on the dump.
4   Clip and tidy the hedge on the west side of the Seagull Lane patch. This was a big job as the hedge had become somewhat unruly over the years.  Here are Tony, Jennifer and Juliette at work.

The resulting cuttings were collected into a pile for a future bonfire maybe.

5. Power scythe around the cherry trees near Frank’s seat.  This was carried out by Dave following a bit of power scythe tuition from Nigel.

6          Litter pick and clean signcases done as usual by the ever cheerful Lesley.

7            Continue with laying of reptile mats by Dan and Terry

Thanks to Pam for providing coffee and biscuits during the break.

During the break we admired the new handrail down to Frank’s seat – many thanks to Havant Borough Council for a good job well done.
One unscheduled job, not discovered until near the end of the session, was to remove branches from a fallen large Crack Willow tree that were blocking the north path. Kathy and Debi set about this task with gusto, helped on one occasion by a passing visitor.

The next workday is scheduled for Thursday 21st October 2021 from 10am to 12 noon.

Wildlife observations from Brian
I spotted two Common Darter dragonflies on the main gravel path, one male with bright red body. They like the warmth of the stones.
During the trimming of the hedge on the Seagull Lane patch by volunteers I pointed out some Hornbeam leaves. I don’t think Hornbeam was one of the plants originally planted.
The attractive leaves of Virginia Creeper are also prominent in the hedgerow.

Finally, here is what I think is an Ichneumon Wasp feeding on Hogweed flowers. I am not sure what species, but maybe David Search can enlighten us.

For more wildlife news please see . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


Conservation Work session – Thursday 16th September 2021
Report by Colin Brotherston. Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows
Ten volunteers (including leader) turned out on a warm and sunny morning with no wind.Colin arrived early to unlock HQ and get tools ready. All the volunteers had arrived by 10.00. There was a short welcome talk to allocate tasks and emphasis safe working procedures.
The meadow was looking superb as usual with an autumnal tinge to the vegetation. As usual there were plenty of tasks as follows:
1          Litter picking and sign case cleaning.
2          Clear vegetation overhanging paths.
3          Rake arisings from recent mowing in Seagull Lane Patch (SLP).
4          Clearing the southern end of the bramble path by Gooseberry cottage.
5          Start to clear ditch behind the hedge in SLP.
6          Continue to lay reptile mats and inspect for reptile.

Beryl did a litter pick. There was little litter visible. Beryl also cleaned the sign cases. Brian showed her where all the sign cases where located. There did not appear to be much litter about but we may find more hidden when vegetation dies down later in the year.

Jennifer, Pam and Patsy commenced task 3 with rakes and drag sheets. The arisings were dry and were taken to the dump located at the north of Seagull Lane patch.

Following Brian’s instructions, Jennifer cleared several Blackthorn suckers which were threatening to invade the Oak plantation area.

New member Paul accompanied Suzanne and Tony to the south meadow to start task 4. The southern end of the bramble path had become completely overgrown. Maurice subsequently reported that the path had been cleared almost all the way to the northern end.

Finally Dan and Maurice continued laying reptile mats. This task has taken a lot of effort and we are hoping to inspect the mats on a regular basis.

Coffee and biscuits were enjoyed in the small meeting circle courtesy of Pam.

After coffee all the tasks continued. Maurice joined Paul and Tony to clear some larger branches blocking the bramble path while Dan inspected reptile mats with Brian. Considerable excitement was generated by the discovery of a Slow-worm under one of the reptile mats that Dan had been putting out. There’s been no sign as yet of the two Grass-snakes that were translocated here on Sep 9th.
Colin started clearing the ditch behind the hedge in Seagull Lane patch. This task will be continued at future sessions.
The session ended at 12.00 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 12.15. So ended a good session with good progress on all tasks.
The next work session is scheduled for Sunday 3rd October starting at 10am.

For wildlife observations go to . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


Conservation Work session – Sunday 5th September 2021
Report by Maurice Lillie.  Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows
I arrived at HQ at 09.00 to take delivery of a trailer load of soil to be incorporated into a hibernaculum.
Nigel too was there to help unloading the soil, but more about that later.
It was a glorious morning 21 degrees C and getting warmer to welcome a mini heat wave.
By 10.00, 11 more volunteers had arrived to hear what tasks needed their attention.
Thanks to Helena for taking the group photo allowing Brian to get in the shot for a change.

Colin and Tony                                          Gordon and Pam

Dan                                               Tony and Maurice

Five first aiders were present. Colin, Jennifer, Terry, Dan and Maurice.  Here is the Emergency First Aid Certificate to prove it!
Jennifer loaded a wheelbarrow with litter picker, bags and hoop together with signcase cleaning kit and set off to out to see what litter she could unearth. The most interesting discovery was 15 glass bottles, including one unopened, hidden amongst the Butterbur. What a shame that these visitors could not be bothered to put their empties in the nearby litter bin but, thank you Jennifer for finding and disposing of them.
Pam and Helena trimmed overhanging vegetation along the sides of paths south of Beryl’s Seat and having finished that moved to Mike’s hedge to remove an overgrowth of bindweed.
Nigel power scythed sections of the Seagull Lane Patch, breaking off to cut the Play Area and the smaller (south) Meeting Circle in North Meadow. Later, he cut around Frank’s Seat and some of the paths to and from it and some scallops on the way.

Tony and Patsy went down to the South Gate area and gathered up the remains of some previous branch clearance to relocate it onto an old pile of branches and twigs nearby in the often wet, sedgey area of SM4. This was easier said than done as the old pile was completely overgrown by two years of nettle and bramble growth. They fought their way through tall grasses and sedges and with a little guidance from Maurice eventually found the spot. After this they joined Pam and Helena at Mike’s Hedge.

Dan and Terry laid out several numbered reptile mats that Dan had brought over in a trolley.

Debbie and Gordon raked the arisings from the recently mowed Environment Agency Flood Barrier path and dumped it on an old grass dump nearby.   Having completed this they joined Pam, Helena, Tony and Patsy in the Rowan area to clear around the trees.
Colin and Juliette cut back the advancing wall of Michaelmas Daisies on the east side of the wildflower area in Central Meadow.

In the process of cutting they uncovered a few fruits of Strawberry Clover which we hope will be given a better chance of survival by the cutting back of the Daisies.
Afterwards they moved into the South Meadow and worked their way along path that skirts the east side near Gooseberry Cottage. Considerable care needed to be exercised to avoid damaging some precious wildflowers that flourish there.
At 11.00 we stopped for a well-earned and hugely enjoyed, break of tea, coffee and biscuits at Frank’s Seat.
Thank you very much Pam, as always.

After the break we all continued with our designated tasks.
Nigel, Colin and Juliette assisted me in the construction of a Hibernaculum near the River towards the north end of Seagull Lane Patch. Several layers of hardcore, rotted logs, earth, old rotted grass, twigs and dead branches were placed to provide many mini habitats for bugs and sundry creepy crawlies that will provide sustenance for reptiles which hopefully find shelter and even, maybe safe hibernation for them. It just needs a little more work to complete.
The tasks were completed by 12.10. Tools were returned to the Tool Store, cleaned and put away.
The next volunteer work session is on Thursday 16 September 2021. All existing and any new volunteers would be most welcome. Meeting at HQ at 09.55 to be briefed on selected tasks. Refreshments provided. Instruction and use of tools will be given and first aiders will be present.

Wildlife observations
I caught a pair of hoverflies mating.  Not sure of the species.


Conservation Work session – Thursday 19th August 2021
Report by Colin Brotherston.  Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows 
Ten volunteers (including leader) turned out on a pleasant mild morning with no wind. The temperature was 17°C at the start of the session and there was no precipitation. Humidity fairly high. Colin arrived early to unlock HQ and get tools ready. All the volunteers had arrived by 10.00. There was a short welcome talk to allocate tasks and emphasis safe working procedures.
The meadow was looking superb with growth in abundance everywhere. This required some tidying up for the benefit of users. Tasks for the work session were as follows:
1 Litter picking and sign case cleaning.
2 Clear vegetation overhanging paths.
3 Mow and tidy the meeting circle by the N bridge.
4 Cut overhanging branch and tidy arisings at S entrance
5 Trim and tidy hedge on corner of the main path in the central meadow.6 Trim vegetation around sign board at Seagull Lane entrance.

Beryl did a litter pick. There was little litter visible. Colin retrieved some beer tins that had been thrown off the S bridge. Beryl also cleaned the sign cases.
Pam and Patsy set off to clip overhanging vegetation from the main path going S from the N bridge.
Meanwhile Jennifer trimmed the Blackthorn bushes which were partly obscuring the main interpretation board.
Dave Mc, Tony and Gordon set off with saws and the power pruner to the south entrance where they removed a branch which was obstructing the path and also tidied up previously cut branches.

Finally Dan and Dave P mowed and trimmed the ‘play area’ on the north meadow.
Coffee and biscuits were enjoyed at Frank’s seat.
After coffee task 5 was started. The hedge which was a dead hedge has become very alive and required substantial trimming. This hedge will need further work at a future work session.
The session ended at 12.00 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 12.15. So ended a good session with good progress on all tasks.
The next work session is planned for Sunday 5th September starting at 10am.

For Brian’s wildlife observations
go to . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


SUNDAY AUGUST 1st – 2021
Conservation Work session

Report by Kathy Edwards. Photos & wildlife by Brian Fellows
Twelve volunteers (including leader) turned out on a cloudy but very warm morning, with little wind.

The sun broke through on one occasion but not enough to warrant the task of checking the reptile mats today. There are more mats still to lay and it is hoped that this will be done at the next work session when Dan and Terry have completed the job of numbering the remaining mats. The Meadow looked splendid after its annual cut, even more so after everyone’s hard work during the morning. Kathy was leading and most of the volunteers arrived at the start time of 10.00. The usual welcome, briefing and safety reminders were soon concluded.
The tasks chosen for today were:
1          Path clipping, especially the central and south meadow and Palmer’s Road Copse .
2          Power scythe paths in Seagull Lane patch and along the butterfly path round the Lumley area, as well as the round meeting circles on the north meadow.
3          Litter pick and clean signcases .
4          Clear steps in north-east corner and near Frank’s seat.
5          Tidy trees/thin growth in the play area circle.
6          Move wood piles to possible hibernaculum site.

The most pressing jobs today were cutting the grass paths, clearing the steps and main paths of brambles, and nettles. Armed with shears, Pam, Debi and Terry diligently tackled the overhanging vegetation on the paths, starting at Palmers Road Copse and systematically working their way back through the meadow to HQ. Patsy was also cutting stray vegetation on some of the minor paths.

Jennifer was the able litter picker and signcase cleaner today, while Colin set to work on the urgent job of clearing the steps in the NE corner as they were totally overgrown.

Nigel, as usual, undertook sterling work with the power scythe. He initially cut the paths in the Seagull Lane patch, as well as a small patch for the siting of the Hibernaculum.
Maurice had brought some wood and soil from home which will be useful for when this is constructed.

Dean and Tony raked up the grass arisings from the mowing and also cut back some of the more vigorous trees and bushes that were overhanging the grass path.

Nigel went on to cut the two circles and also some scallops on the east side of the Rowans. While cutting the scallops he collected a piece of wire that effectively stopped the power scythe cutting blades. With some ingenuity, and with a lump hammer, normal cutting was soon resumed! The area around the Rowans was obviously a challenge today as Dan had tried earlier to cut the vegetation with the strimmer, but without success.
Maurice had already been cutting and thinning out the willow in the play area circle and he went on to finish this job. This is proving to be a really good space for the community to use and it is intended that we try to keep it well trimmed.
A stop for coffee and biscuits at 11 am was welcome. Thank you Pam for being so efficient at providing and serving out much needed refreshment.
After coffee most of the volunteers returned to finish their previous tasks, with Jennifer finishing off raking the Seagull Lane patch paths and Dean and Tony raking the circles.
Colin cut back the grass on the steps near Frank’s seat.
The overgrown butterfly path around the central wild flower area was power scythed and any overhanging branches were helpfully cut by Debi, and the higher ones by Maurice with Dan’s trusty secateurs.
This busy session ended at 12.00 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 12.15.

Wildlife observations
Some of the normally white Hogweed flower heads are turning an attractive shade of pink.
The Japanese Spindle bush on the west bank of the river just south of the north bridge now has white flowers. In autumn it bears orange fruits (arils) which last through winter.   This evergreen shrub is native to Japan but is planted in this country. I am not sure how this specimen got here, but it is now very well established.
More wildlife observations are on the blog at . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


THURSDAY JULY 15 – 2021
Conservation Work session

Report by Reg Newnham.  Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows
Fifteen volunteers (including leader) turned out on St Swithin’s Day
At the start of the session the weather was sunny and warm – a good omen for the Summer to come? Reg Newnham was leading. All the volunteers arrived at the start time. There were no new volunteers. After the usual brief welcome tasks were described and allocated.
The tasks were:
1   Remove twig barrier from around the north meadow flower rich meadow.
2   Cut Blackberry path & mow Child area on north meadow .
3   Work on repair of steps down to the river in north-east corner.
4   Lay Reptile mats according to plan from David Search .
5   Litter pick and signcase cleaning.

With many tasks, the group split into small groups.
Pam, Jennifer, Patsy & Gordon set to work removing the twig barrier, always a difficult task due to the growth of surrounding vegetation. This year was particularly difficult as there had been so much top growth. Reg said he will recommend in future years we just mark this area with stakes. The small and larger branches were left in piles for future construction of hibernacula.

Tony with assistance (Colin & Gordon) power scythed the ‘Blackberry path’ at the top of the north meadow where the best Blackberries grow. They also mowed the ‘play area’.

Terry built up and infilled the steps leading down to the north river by the railway line. More hoggin is still required.
Following the plan made by David Search, Dan, Kathy, and Geoffrey prepared the ground and placed the reptile mats. Some of the old mats could not be reused so Dan, in advance of to-day’s work party, prepared and numbered new mats.   This task will continue with the next work session.

Lesley & Beryl did their usual litter pick and sign case cleaning. This is a most important activity, keeping the meadow smart and presentable.

We were pleased to welcome Robert the Norse litter man to carry out his regular emptying of the litter and dog bins.  Such an important job.  Thanks Robert.
A welcome stop for coffee at 11.00 with a good selection of biscuits. Thank you, Pam.

After coffee, work continued as above.
Dan helped Patsy to identify some plants from leaves using his new iPhone Plant ID app.
At 12.00 all tools were returned to HQ and a productive session was finished. HQ was finally secured at 12.25.
The next work session will be on Sunday 1st August.

For Brian’s wildlife observations
Go to . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


SUNDAY JULY 4 – 2021
Conservation Work session – Sunday 4th July 2021
Report by Kathy Edwards. Photos and wildlife by Brian Fellows
Fourteen volunteers (including leader) attended today’s session. It was cloudy but the predicted rain did not materialise and indeed it proved to be warm and at times rather muggy. A number of volunteers worked up quite a sweat on their tasks today! Kathy was leading and ably assisted by Colin who, as usual, had kindly co-ordinated the attendees and job list for her in advance.   All of the volunteers arrived by the start time of 10.00 and we welcomed Patsy to the group. Helena offered to take the group photo which meant that Brian was on it for a change!
Following a reminder of the names and introduction of the First Aiders together with some discussions about the assigned tasks everyone dispersed to all areas of the meadow to undertake the tasks In hand.
The tasks chosen for today were:
1          Clearing vegetation from the main paths.
2          Cutting brambles by the Hazel trees at the North Bridge.
3          Litter picking and sign cleaning.
4          Plant Greater Burdocks
5          Repair steps to the North East corner
6          Remove Hemlock Water-dropwort flower heads from Central meadow flower area

With all the rain and warm weather over recent weeks the grass and brambles on the meadow have grown with luxurious abandon and many pairs of shears were needed today to cut back the overhanging vegetation on the paths. Pam, Juliette, Helena and Patsy set to work on the main routes through the meadow and did sterling work trimming the nettles and wayward brambles.
The brambles near the North Bridge were too much for shears so Geoff and Debi exchanged these for the long handled scythe/cutters and managed to clear an extensive area near the hazel trees.
Nigel was a whiz with the power scythe and managed to cut the circle in the North Meadow as well as numerous overgrown paths, including the Seagull lane patch. He also cleared the ground just outside the tool store so that Colin was able to plant the four Giant Burdock plants that Brian had raised from seed. It is planned to keep this area free of competing vegetation while the plants become established.

All plants in

Maurice and Terry worked hard together all morning on the repair of the steps in the North East corner. This involved collecting stones to infill and proved to be hot work. The job is not quite completed, but will hopefully be done at the next work session.
Lesley was as thorough as usual in her litter picking and cleaning sign cases, often having to rummage in the long grass to retrieve the discarded items. She also did a bit of nettle bashing!

Dan kept up the maintenance of the child friendly area by giving it a mow.

Tony worked on removing the last remaining Hemlock Water Drop Wort flowers on the Central wild flower area.
There was a welcome break at 11am for coffee and biscuits, helpfully provided by Pam. Helena provided an additional treat of chocolate coated ginger.

After the break Debi and Juliette both raked up arisings from Nigel’s power scything. Debi raked the circle, while Juliette did the wide path that had been specially cut to allow access for the annual cut of the Meadow, planned to take place during the next month.
Colin and Geoff headed to Palmers Road Copse where they cleared a couple of branches that were across the path. They also did a trim of the overhanging nettles and brambles.
All the other volunteers continued with their earlier tasks and the session ended at 12 noon. This was a productive work session with everyone’s hard work clearly visible on the meadow. The tool store was locked at 12.20
The next work session will take place on Thursday 15th July 2021.

Wildlife observations
For Brian’s wildlife observations during the work session go to . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


Conservation Work session – Thursday 17th June 2021
Report by Colin Brotherston. Photos by Brian Fellows
Twelve volunteers (including leader) turned out on an overcast morning with no wind. The temperature was 20° C at the start of the session and there was no precipitation. Humidity fairly high. Colin arrived early to unlock HQ and get tools ready. All the volunteers had arrived by 10.00. Dan was not present on the group photo. There was a short welcome talk to allocate tasks. Most volunteers had indicated their intention to attend.
The meadow was looking superb with growth in abundance everywhere. This required some tidying up for the benefit of users. Jobs for today were:
1          Litter picking and signcase cleaning.
2          Clear vegetation from overhanging paths.
3            Remove flower heads from Hemlock Water-dropwort in the Lumley area
4          Repair steps down to the river in NE corner.
5          Clear suffocating plant growth around Great Burnet on north meadow.
6            Conduct power pruner tutorial.

Lesley did a litter pick as usual. She was joined by Beryl. They did not find too much litter which was encouraging. Lesley also cleaned the signcases.

Maurice lead task 6 showing Kathy, David and Gordon how to use the new Power Pruner safely. It is hoped that this will be an invaluable tool in the autumn when trees and bushes need attention. This task was completed in the first 30 minutes.
Jennifer and Suzanne departed to clip overhanging vegetation from the main paths. This is a task which will need to be repeated. It is hoped that Norse might get around to strimming the paths before too long.
Dan and Terry set out to repair the steps to the river in the NE corner. (task 4) In particular they needed to remove an iron pin which had become prominent. Colin and Brian discussed whether steps are needed here at all as this section of the river is a good place for dogs to splash. Colin was of the view that the steps were of some value.
Pam led task 3 to remove flower heads from Hemlock Water-dropwort in the Lumley area. This is an alternative and less wearisome method of controlling the spread of this invasive plant onto the Lumley area.  She was joined by Kathy, Gordon and David. The cut flower heads were finally bagged up and removed.

Coffee and biscuits were enjoyed at Frank’s seat.
After coffee Task 3 was continued. Dan joined Brian to do a recount of some of the orchids.
Maurice attended to minor tasks including some careful clearance of Meadowsweet which was threatening one of the Great Burnet clumps.
Terry tidied up the steps in the north-east corner with the task requiring more work at a later session.
The session ended shortly after 12.00 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 12.10. So ended a good session with good progress on all tasks.

For wildlife observations including the orchids count
go to . . .
https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/wildlife-news-blog/


Conservation Work session – Sunday 6th June 2021
Report by Maurice Lillie. Photos by Brian Fellows
Continuing our carefully pre-planned sessions of volunteer work parties, to ensure compliance with Covid Rules, 13 volunteers, including leader, assembled at HQ, into predetermined working groups. Brian took a record photo of those present.
Five tasks had been arranged as follows.
Clearing overgrowth of vegetation around entrance information boards and sign cases. Lesley set to work with gusto and extended her task to include removing nettles from adjacent walkways.
Nigel, driving the Power scythe, set of along the raised gravel paths to cut back the recent spurt growth of stinging nettles, carefully avoiding the avenues of Cow Parsley and other plants, most notably a particular variety of Ragwort, not yet in bloom, on the North Path.
Nigel then cut the scallops in the North Meadow and created a new site for a future Hibernaculum nearby. This is the start of a proposal to construct/enhance several new and other hibernacula.
Under Brian’s watchful eye Nigel mowed the two casual paths in the Seagull Lane patch, taking care to avoid cutting the freshly flowering Germander Speedwell.  The tall vegetation around the five oak trees was also trimmed. Nigel also cut the “ butterfly path” in South Meadow.
Pam leading a team comprising Jennifer, Gordon and Debbie, armed with shears and David S with a strimmer, did a closer cut back of nettles along the main path, following Nigel’s initial cut, to stop the tall stinging nettles from drooping over the footpaths.

David used the strimmer to remove the overgrowth on other occasional grass paths and beside step’s handrails. The steps down to Frank’s Seat were also trimmed of grass. This job was one of two main tasks for the day and was successfully completed. The work was clearly appreciated by many members of the walking public, judging by the number of compliments received.

The other main task was phase 3 of the removal of Hemlock Water Dropwort in the wildflower area in the east side of Central Meadow. The primary reason for this action is that this vigorous plant threatens to endanger this wildflower area. Old hand at this task, David P assisted by David Mc and Tony, dug out, bagged and cable tied then transported 10 bags of whole plants to the south east corner of North Meadow, where they will decompose over a period of about six months.

Terry and Dan, while avoiding two clumps of interesting vegetation and docks, mowed the play area in North Meadow and removed the cuttings – much to Brian’s delight!

Pam provided refreshments at half time as always which were much appreciated by all!!

The next volunteer work session will be on Thursday, 17th June. Details will be circulated beforehand.


Orchids on Brook Meadow
During the work session we had a visit from a couple of very keen ‘orchid hunters’ named Jim and Dawn from Worthing. They had come over to Emsworth especially to see our orchids, having seen the news on our wildlife blog.

They were most impressed with the quality of the Southern Marsh Orchids and admired some very fine Common Spotted Orchids. They asked to see the hybrid orchids which were showing very nicely. To cap it all, Dawn found the first Brook Meadow Bee Orchid of the year near the path round the Lumley area. Well done Dawn!


Conservation Work session – Thursday 20th May 2021
Report by Reg Newnham. Photos by Brian Fellows
Thirteen volunteers (including leader) turned out on a calm but, with the feeling of ” the calm before the storm”, an overcast sky & threatening drizzle. Reg Newnham was leading. All the volunteers arrived at the start time. There was a new volunteer, Aaron Rose who was made welcome to the group.

Tasks were described and allocated.  The tasks were:
Litter picking
Removal of Hemlock Water-dropwort from Central Meadow’s flower rich area and backfill where there had been removals.
Fill in hole by Beryl’s seat
Cut scallops in North Meadow and mow and rake the “child area” also in North Meadow.
Strim the Riverbank south of the north bridge.
Complete the dead hedging by the S-bend in the river
With many tasks, the group split into subgroups.
Lesley and Jennifer did their usual litter pick and were also acted as the duty First Aiders for the session. Fortunately, in this respect, there services were not required.

Lesley and Jennifer also spent some time looking for the first signs of orchids on the main orchid area of which there were many with spotted leaves!
The largest subgroup, with Kathy in charge, worked on the removal of the Hemlock Water-dropwort from the Lumley area. This is designed to prevent this plant from spreading across this valuable wild flower area.  With all the recent rain the wet soil helped the team, but this is a mammoth task and there remain many plants.

Kathy Edwards filled the hazardous hole that had appeared in front of Beryl’s seat closely watched by Tony and Terry!
Nigel cut the grass and raked as required in the North Meadow.
David Search, using the strimmer, cut back the vegetation by the riverbank. As this kit had not been used for some time it needed some attention to start.
Terry and Aaron worked on the dead hedge fence by the river and, after 18 months, it was finally completed. Well done.

A welcome stop for coffee at 11.00 with a good selection of biscuits. Thank you, Pam. The coffee break was held at Beryl’s seat. This was the first time we have been able to have refreshments owing to the Covid restrictions which are now relaxed. A small celebration of getting back to some normality.   After coffee, work continued as above.

At 12.00 all tools were returned to HQ and a productive session was finished. HQ was finally secured at 12.23.
The next scheduled work session is Sunday 6th June.


Conservation Work Session – Sunday 2nd May 2021
Report by Maurice Lillie. Photos by Brian Fellows
Weather: 10 C overcast and part sunny. Continuing our carefully pre-planned session of volunteer work parties by Colin, to ensure compliance with Covid Rules, it was pleasing that twelve volunteers arrived at HQ at the usual time keen to “get on with it”. Brian took a record photograph of those present at the outset, socially distancing!

Four tasks had been arranged, as follows.
Litter-picking. Jennifer and John, appropriately armed with litter pickers, mauve bags, and hoop, set off to start at Palmers Road Copse and surrounding paths. Later reports that they filled a large bag with litter. What a difference that made.
Nigel driving the power scythe and Pam carrying shears and rake proceeded to the Rowan plantation to trim the around the trees and the spaces in between them. On the way there, Nigel stopped off to cut the ‘Play Area’ in the North Meadow.   An excellent job well done.

The main task was to remove the increasing spread of Hemlock Water-dropwort from the Lumley area to prevent it damaging what is the most important wild flower area on Brook Meadow. Assistant Leader Kathy assisted by, Debi, Dave P and Geoffrey, dug out, bagged, transported, and dumped 15 large bags of whole plants. Each bag was securely tied with a cable tie, to prevent leakage. A box of surgical gloves was provided to be worn underneath the usual gloves to ensure that the most likely point of skin contact would be eliminated as the juice from the plants can damage skin.

See below for a video clip of this work

I chose the space behind the grass dump in the south east corner of NM to place the bags for at least six months to ensure decomposition. This was an excellent heavy job well done. A further two sessions should see this task complete.
The ongoing task of rebuilding the dead hedge along the “S” bend continued under the watchful eye of Terry assisted by Helen Baco and John Hughes. A track made by dogs down to the river near the north end of he dead hedge was blocked with a short section of dead hedge construction. Here’s Terry erecting new fence posts.
In between taking photos of the work activities, Brian helped Dan to identify some of the plants that have recently emerged on Brook Meadow. Here’s a shot of Dan inspecting a growth of Hoary Cress on the bonfire site on the Seagull Lane patch. Interestingly, only two plants have successfully got a hold in the ashes of the old bonfire, namely Hoary Cress and Creeping Thistle.
Tasks not carried out and therefore moved to a later date are –
Mowing the ‘meeting circles’ in the North Meadow.
Re-cutting the scallops in NM and other places – CM and SM and SLP
Reinforcing the informal dead hedge in CM, north west corner.
South meadow servicing eastern edge path and clearing scattered twigs and branches.
North meadow northeast corner clear tree cutting debris and adding to hibernaculum.

Next volunteer work session will be on Thursday 20 May. Details will be circulated beforehand.

Video clip of the removal of Hemlock Water-dropwort


Conservation Work session – Thursday 15th April 2021
Report by Kathy Edwards. Photos by Brian Fellows
Fifteen volunteers (including leader) turned out on this lovely sunny spring morning. It was a calm day and the early slight nip in the air quickly became less evident once everyone started working on their tasks. Kathy was leading and ably assisted by Colin who had kindly co-ordinated the attendees and job list for her in advance.   Most of the volunteers arrived by the start time of 10.00 and we welcomed Beryl to the group.

Following some changes to the pre-assigned task list and a few safety reminders everyone busied themselves with the tasks In hand. The tasks chosen for today were:
1      Continue work on the dead hedge.
2      Distribute the remaining wood chippings on the paths.
3       Litter picking.
4      Collecting wood/bonfire,
5.      Clearing wood piles in the south Meadow
6.      Covering the dead fox in Palmer’s Road Copse .

The dead hedge working party was split into 3 groups. Terry and Reg continued to knock in further stakes . . .

while Pam and Dan sourced suitable willow branches . . .

for Jennifer and Gordon so they could expertly weave the willow branches in between the stakes.

The groups worked very hard at producing an effective and sturdy dead hedge. Hopefully the task will be completed at the next session. In between weaving the new dead hedge Gordon and Jennifer also did some repairs to the lower dead hedge that was obviously being used as a cut way to the main path, collecting some of the material from the long grass nearby.

The last of the wood chippings were finally laid on the paths, with Mike, Nigel and Tony filling and carting the wheelbarrows and Suzanne raking the chipping out on the paths. With very little rain in the last few weeks most of the paths are now fairly dry although there were still a few damp areas that have now benefited from the application of the wood chippings.

Lesley was as diligent as usual in her litter picking and cleaning sign cases, helped today by Beryl.
David S and Colin initially had the unenviable task of covering up the dead fox in Palmers Road Copse. It has now been dead some time and although fairly well hidden it was felt that covering it with branches/wood chippings would allow it to decompose naturally out of sight. David then lent a hand with the cutting of dead hedge material.

While the willow was being cut in the north meadow it was decided that Nigel would cut the small area of grass in front of the fallen willow. Nigel managed to get the power scythe working without any problem after its winter rest and once the cutting was completed helped Colin with raking up the arisings.

This is an ideal area for children to play, climb and picnic. Brian was also pleased to have his favourite sitting area trimmed!
In keeping with current restrictions there was no coffee break and work continued until 11.30 when the tools were packed away. As usual everyone worked really hard and this was a busy and productive work session. The tool store was locked at 11.50.
The next work session is planned for Sunday 2nd May 2021


Conservation Work session – Sunday 28th March 2021
Report by Colin Brotherston. Photos by Brian Fellows
Seventeen volunteers (including leader) turned out on an overcast morning with light winds and occasional gusts. The temperature was 10° C at the start of the session and there was no precipitation.
This meeting followed the usual COVID secure session format with no break for coffee and a shorter time span of 90 minutes.
Colin arrived early to unlock HQ and get tools ready. All but two of the volunteers had arrived by 10.00. There was no welcome talk and the register was pre-prepared. Most of the volunteers had communicated their intention to attend so tasks were pre-allocated and started almost immediately.
The tasks chosen for today were a continuation of those from the last session.
1            Spreading chippings on to the muddy paths in the north meadow and Palmers Road Copse
2            Installing posts and weaving the S-bend dead hedge
3          Moving cut branches from the NE corner to the central dump area.
4          Cutting dead Reed Canary-grass from the Butterbur area in the central meadow.
5          Litter picking

Lesley did a litter pick as usual.
Nigel refitted a wheel to one of the wheelbarrows. The tyre had been re-inflated and hopefully will be good for some time.
Kathy and Juliette started by planting some snowdrop bulbs. It is hoped that these will brighten the meadow in late winter. This task was quickly finished and they joined other teams.
Two teams of three worked on spreading wood chippings onto muddy paths. One team in the north meadow by Beryl’s seat and the other in Palmers Road Copse. The mud is beginning to dry but it is hoped that the chippings will encourage walkers to use the paths and not make new bypass routes.

Another two moved the cut wood from the north east corner (task 3). This task is not finished.

Terry led a team of 5 to continue work on the dead hedge (task 2), preparing and fixing posts into position and starting some of the weaving.
Maurice and Mike cut material for weaving between the posts. It is necessary to use freshly cut material for weaving as this will bend without snapping. There is still plenty of hedge to be repaired so this task will continue.
Another team of two/three worked on removing dead Reed Canary-grass  from the Butterbur area. Extreme care was needed to avoid stepping on the flower spikes of which there were plenty.

Thank you Catherine and Juliette

Brian and Dan will count the spikes next week and it is hoped that there will be an increase from last year when the count was low. Some of the arisings were placed at the entrance to the north cut circle. There is evidence of dog disturbance here and this needs to be discouraged to avoid damage to bulbs.
Colin organised the teams to ensure everybody was usefully employed.
The session ended shortly after 11.30 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 11.50. So ended a good session with good progress on all tasks.
The nest work session is planned for Thursday 15th April 2021.


Conservation Work session – Thursday 18th March 2021
Report by Colin Brotherston. Photos by Brian Fellows
Thirteen volunteers (including leader) turned out on an overcast morning with no wind. The temperature was 7° C at the start of the session and there was an exceedingly small amount of precipitation.  This meeting followed the same format as the last COVID secure session with no break for coffee and a shorter time span of 90 minutes.
Colin arrived early to unlock HQ and get tools ready. Some volunteers were already waiting and everyone had arrived by 10.00. There was no welcome talk and the register was pre-prepared. Most of the volunteers had communicated their intention to attend so tasks were pre-allocated and started almost immediately.

Here are some of the volunteers at the start of the session.

Jennifer and Kathy signing a card for Wally and Rosemary Osborne’ 60th Wedding Anniversary.  Well done!   Wally was an original member of the group and former chairman.

Reg moving a trolley full of tools, etc

Terry the axe man

The tasks chosen for today were a continuation of those from the last session.
1            Spreading chippings on to the muddy paths
2            Installing posts and weaving the S-bend dead hedge
3            Erecting a barrier for the flower rich area in the north meadow
4          Litter picking

Kathy led a team of 5 to tackle task 1. The chippings which had been dumped in the Seagull Lane patch by recent tree cutting contractors were barrowed to the muddy paths between the North and Central meadows. The chippings were then raked onto the path. There are still plenty of chippings to be distributed. This task requires a lot of energy partly because the chippings have to be transported a considerable distance to where they are needed.

 

Terry led a team of 3 to continue work on the dead hedge (task 2), preparing and fixing posts into position and starting some of the weaving. There is still plenty of hedge to be repaired so this task will continue.
Maurice led the wildflower task with 2 volunteers. This task is now finished.

Brian wished to do his annual Butterbur flower spike count. But this task required that some of last season’s growth of Reed Canary-grass needed to be cleared away so the spikes could be visible. Despite the help of one volunteer this task proved rather difficult, the reed grass being too tough for a slasher.
It was agreed that at the next session on March 28th we would allocate two volunteers to assist with shears. Care needs to be taken to avoid stepping on the Butterbur flower spikes. Brian is of the view that as long as the count is made by the beginning of April it should not be too late.
Lesley and Jennifer departed to litter pick by Palmers Road car park.
Colin organised the teams to ensure everybody was usefully employed. There is one wheelbarrow wheel that has a soft tyre and this needs to be repaired before the next session.
The session ended shortly after 11.30 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 11.50.
So ended a good session with good progress on all tasks. Volunteers appeared to enjoy themselves. It is planned to continue sessions with this format for the next couple of months.
The next work session will take place on Sunday 28th March, one week earlier than normal to avoid clashing with Easter Day.


Conservation Work session – Sunday 7th March 2021
Report by Colin Brotherston. Photos by Brian Fellows
Sixteen volunteers (including leader) turned out on a dry sunny morning with no wind. The temperature was 7 deg C at the start of the session but with some warmth in the sun it did not feel cold.
This was the first work session of the year. Sessions had been suspended in January and February due to the Covid 19 emergency. However as most volunteers will have received vaccinations and the infection rate falling it was deemed time to start up again with a few precautions.
Colin and Maurice arrived early to unlock HQ and get tools ready. Most of the volunteers arrived by the start time of 10.00. There was no welcome talk and the register was pre-prepared. Most of the volunteers had pre-announced their intention to attend so tasks were pre-allocated and started almost immediately. There was no break for coffee and the session was slightly shorter.
The tasks chosen for today were:
1            Spreading chippings on to the muddy paths
2            Installing posts and weaving the S-bend dead hedge
3            Erecting a barrier for the flower rich area in the north meadow

Volunteers preparing for the work session

Kathy led a team of 5 to tackle task 1. The chippings which had been dumped in the Seagull Lane patch by recent tree cutting contractors were barrowed to the muddy paths between the North and Central meadows. The chippings were then raked onto the path. This area is always very muddy and there remain many more chippings to spread at future sessions.

Job completed

Terry led a team of 6 to continue work on the dead hedge (task 2), preparing and fixing posts into position and starting some of the weaving. This task will be continued at the next session.
Maurice led the wildflower barrier task with 2 volunteers. This area will need further work at future sessions.

Colin organised the teams to ensure everybody was usefully employed and attended to a few minor tasks including erecting notices on the wildflower rich area and applying dry lubricant to padlocks which were becoming corroded with lack of use during the winter months.
The session ended promptly at about 11.30 and the tools were packed away. The tool store was locked at 12.00.
So ended a good session with good progress on the three tasks. Volunteers appeared to enjoy themselves. It is planned to continue sessions with this format for the next couple of months.
The next work session is planned for Thursday 18th March 2021 from 10am to 11.30am. Colin asks anyone who intends to take part in work sessions to contact him first so that the tasks can be planned in advance. colin.brotherston@btinternet.com Phone: 07779 759696


For Workday reports for 2020 go to . . . https://www.brookmeadow.org.uk/conservation-news-archives/

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